GENERAL FAQS

You will need to bring your referral from your GP or specialist to see Sam, as well as any relevant scans you may have had performed of your hip or knee. Upon booking your appointment, we will send you a Patient Registration Form for you to fill in and also bring with you on the day of consultation.
Majority of your surgery fee will be covered by your private health fund and Medicare, however a detailed itemised quote will be provided to you at the time of your surgery booking.
If you are covered by WorkCover, TAC or Defence there will be no cost to you for any surgery you may have.
Please contact our rooms if you would like more information regarding surgery expenses.
We do require payment of your consultation at the time of your appointment, and we are able to electronically claim your Medicare rebate for your appointment.
 

HIP FAQS

The acetabular labrum is a tough cartilage ring which attaches to the rim of the hip joint socket. The main functions of the labrum are to deepen the socket and assist in the stability, lubrication or reduction of friction, and sensation of the hip joint.

Causes

Acetabular labral tears generally occur in two situations.

  • As a result of traumatic injury to the hip joint. The main cause of a traumatic tear is usually by twisting or pivoting whilst weight bearing.
  • Gradually accumulated damage over time; this is known as a ‘degenerate tear’. Degenerative labral tears develop as a part of hip joint osteoarthritis, dysplasia, capsular laxity or femoro-acetabular impingement (FAI).

Symptoms

  • Pain which can radiate into the groin, down the front of the thigh, buttock, greater trochanter and inside of the knee.
  • This is often made worse with physical activity and positions where the hip is bent, such as deep squatting or rising from a low chair.
  • The symptoms may have been present for a long time, and thought to represent ‘recurrent groin sprains’.
  • Some patients experience ‘mechanical’ symptoms such as a feeling of catching, clicking, locking, stiffening, unpredictable weakness or giving way of their hip, leading to a decrease in the range of motion.

Treatment Options

To further discuss this type of injury and your treatment options in more detail please contact Mr Patten’s rooms on (03) 9516 2390

Femoro-acetabular (FAI) impingement is a condition of too much friction in the hip joint where the ball or femoral head, rubs abnormally with the socket or acetabulum, creating damage to the joint.

Causes

FAI occurs when hip bones do not form normally during childhood.

Symptoms

  • Pain in the groin area or the outside of the hip
  • Stiffness
  • Limping
  • Sharp stabbing pain may occur with turning, twisting, and squatting

Treatment Options

To further discuss this type of injury and your treatment options in more detail please contact Mr Patten’s rooms on (03) 9516 2390

The cartilage between the femoral head and the acetabulum (cup or socket) wears away, allowing the bones to rub against each other. The joint can become uneven, pitted, erode, and develop bone spurs.

Causes

The degenerative process may be accelerated by a previous hip injury or bone fracture, certain childhood conditions, and being overweight which causes increased force on the hip joint.

Symptoms

  • Pain
  • Stiffness
  • Instability
  • Limping
  • Muscle weakness

Treatment Options

Often early hip joint damage can be managed without requiring surgery. If non-surgical treatments fail and there are persistent symptoms or significant injury, hip arthroscopy may be a suitable and successful.
For significant bony degenerative changes a hip arthroplasty, or total hip replacement, is generally the most appropriate form of treatment.

To further discuss this type of injury and your treatment options in more detail please contact Mr Patten’s rooms on (03) 9516 2390

 

KNEE FAQS

A tear to the medial or lateral meniscus. Damage to the cartilage decreases shock absorption capability and increases friction in the knee joint.

Causes

Usually caused by a twisting injury.

Symptoms

  • Pain on the inner or outer side of the knee
  • Tenderness and swelling
  • Locking or catching sensation localized to the side of the knee.
  • Floating fragments of cartilage can also cause the knee joint to lock, and damage the smooth joint surfaces leading to osteoarthritis if untreated.

Treatment Options

To further discuss this type of injury and your treatment options in more detail please contact Mr Patten’s rooms on (03) 9516 2390

A rupture of the anterior or posterior cruciate ligament causing knee instability.
An anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury is a relatively common sporting injury, especially with high impact twisting sports such as netball and football.

Causes

Abnormal twisting of the knee, causing the ligament to overstretch and tear.

Symptoms

  • Pain
  • Swelling
  • Feeling weak and unreliable

Treatment Options

To further discuss this type of injury and your treatment options in more detail please contact Mr Patten’s rooms on (03) 9516 2390

Knee cap moves laterally or to the outside of the knee when flexing or bending the knee.

Causes

Mal-tracking of the patella or knee cap is generally caused by structural abnormalities of the patella stabilizing mechanisms.

Symptoms

Knee cap moves laterally or to the outside of the knee when flexing or bending the knee.

Treatment Options

To further discuss this type of injury and your treatment options in more detail please contact Mr Patten’s rooms on (03) 9516 2390

Fluid filled sacs which develop behind the knee called “Baker’s Cyst”.

Causes

The fluid is usually due to a problem within the knee joint such as torn menisci, worn articular cartilage, or arthritis.

Symptoms

  • Cyst becomes swollen with fluid and quite large, with a definite lump.
  • Occasionally the cyst can leak fluid or rupture into the calf causing swelling, tightness and pain.

Treatment Options

To further discuss this type of injury and your treatment options in more detail please contact Mr Patten’s rooms on (03) 9516 2390

Degenerative joint disease caused by gradual deterioration or loss of the cartilage in the shock absorber layer of the joint.
As the cartilage is worn away, the bone forms spurs or areas of abnormal hardening, and fluid-filled pockets in the marrow known as subchondral cysts.

Causes

As part of the aging process, the joint cartilage layer becomes brittle and more susceptible to wear and injury.
Knee osteoarthritis may also occur as a result of previous joint trauma, ligament instability, or abnormal stresses to the joint.
People who are overweight are at a much higher risk of rapid worsening of knee arthritis.

Symptoms

  • As the disorder progresses, pain results from deformation of the bones and fluid accumulation in the joints.
  • Pain or aching with weight bearing or activity such as walking.
  • Swelling
  • Eventually may be deformed in shape, which is visible on xray

Treatment Options

  • Arthroscopic surgery
  • Osteotomy
  • Total knee replacement

To further discuss this type of injury and your treatment options in more detail please contact Mr Patten’s rooms on (03) 9516 2390



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